Tag Archives: beginning artist

Daffodils by Lynnette Horn

Art is in the Editing

I was out in the front yard this morning trimming rose bushes. I know I should have done that in the fall, but winter came on us very quickly this year. We didn’t have much of a fall and before I knew it we were buried in snow and the deadwood would have to stay until I could get to it this spring.  Anyway, there I was pruning away and an amazing thing happened. Without the massive rose bush ruling over the garden, the spring daffodils suddenly took center stage.

I don’t think I had ever given them a second thought before. But there they were in all their glory. Of course, I had to get my camera. And of course, I had to draw a correlation in art. And that is artistic editing. Some call it their artistic license to change things for the sake of the composition.  When I first started painting my own pieces (not patterns), I would take reference photos and try to paint everything that was in the photo.  This made it realistic, right? No, it made a cluttered mess.

By cutting out unnecessary elements, you will draw more attention to the stars of the show. As a new artist, you might ask, “What do I cut out?” Well, that really depends on what you are trying to say with in your painting. What do you want your viewers to see the most? That will be your area of interest or focus. The secondary elements should help lead the viewer through the painting to the focus area and back out again–around and around.

Using the photo above, I might choose to have the rose bush as the main focal point, with the recycle bag in the background and add my loppers to the foreground, totally eliminating the daffodils if I wanted to tell a story about garden pruning. If I wanted to tell a story about spring I may or may not leave the pruned rosebush in the background, keep the clump of grass in the front right and eliminate the rest. Or I might choose just a few daffodils instead of the whole clump. (It’s always good to paint in odd numbers–1, 3 or 5. It adds more interest.)  Or, I might go all dramatic and concentrate on just one bloom. As an artist the decision is all mine. Nothing is written in stone that says I have to stay true to what’s in a photo, or in what I see.

How  would you edit this photo? Is there a story there you’d like to see?

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Beachy_Shell_Collection

Beachy Collection

I’m so excited about my latest downloadable painting patterns being released today. I really didn’t expect them to be available until next week. I put a lot of thought into their creation, so that even someone who has never picked up a paintbrush can paint these. They can be found at http://www.artapprenticeonline.com.

One of the many tools of the learning artist is painting patterns. The trick is to find patterns from artists who do more than teach disco painting, “”Dis go here and ‘dis go there.” A painting pattern should give you something that will progress your journey as an artist not just a pretty design. With it you will expand your arsenal of skills and broaden your knowledge, as well.

Many artists only paint patterns. There is nothing wrong with this if that’s what they want to do. But for me painting patterns is a means to an end, a method of learning, along with DVD’s, streaming videos, seminars and classes, that can advance you towards whatever goal you have with your art. It doesn’t matter if you choose a path to decorative painting or fine art, availing yourself to painting patterns can lead you to become an independent artist. I know that is what I wanted when I first started this journey. Luckily, I found  wonderful mentors at Art Apprentice Online, which provides many resources including painting patterns that actually teach.

You can imagine my excitement when I reached the point where I could create on my own patterns with which others could learn. So the cycle continues. The student becoming the teacher.